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Steve Winter's Photos in @stevewinterphoto Instagram Account

Steve Winter's Photos in @stevewinterphoto Instagram Account

Steve Winter

@stevewinterphoto

NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker. Next @NatGeo Live! Jan 19th, Park City, Utah

Steve Winter's Photos shared recently. Find All Instagram Photos and Other Media Types of Steve Winter in stevewinterphoto Instagram Account.

stevewinterphoto's Media: @natgeo @stevewinterphoto

A jaguar head in the medicinal market in Iquitos, Peru

The chief of a i

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto A jaguar head in the medicinal market in Iquitos, Peru The chief of a indigenous group said that they hunt jaguar for their canines 12 months a year to sell to a “Chinese corporation" that comes to buy them every October. Local people need to benefit from living with predators - and not from killing them and selling their parts - a sustainable future includes people living with wildlife - and an intact healthy ecosystem. Biologist, Fernando Tortato writing in a new paper - states that in the Jaguar territory in the Pantanal of Brazil a cow is worth $2000 in its lifetime - where each jaguar in this area brings in $108,000 A YEAR in ECOTOURISM income!!!! So jaguars are safe within this area. Think of all the family members in an area that work in ecotourism to show tourists the jaguars, birds and other wildlife of the area. They work in the lodges - drive the boats - guide the tourists etc. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything under it. #shotoniphone

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A jaguar skin hanging in the medicinal market in Iquitos, Peru

The head

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto A jaguar skin hanging in the medicinal market in Iquitos, Peru The head of a indigenous group said that they hunt jaguar for their canines 12 months a year to sell to a “Chinese corporation" that comes to buy them every October. Local people need to benefit from living with predators - and not from killing them and selling their parts - a sustainable future includes people living with wildlife - and an intact healthy ecosystem. Biologist, Fernando Tortato writing in a new paper - in Jaguar territory in the Pantanal of Brazil a cow is worth $2000 in its lifetime - where each jaguar in this area brings in $108,000 A YEAR in ECOTOURISM income!!!! So jaguars are safe within this area. Think of all the family members in an area that work in ecotourism to show tourists the jaguars, birds and other wildlife of the area. They work in the lodges - drive the boats - guide the tourists etc. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything under it.

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stevewinterphoto's Media: @natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto
I am excited to be showing

@natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto I am excited to be showing my NG Live “On the Trail of Big Cats” tomorrow night in Park City Utah!! Locals showing jaguar skins to tourists that come from Iquitos, Peru The head of this group said that they hunt jaguar for their canines 12 months a year to sell to a “Chinese corporation" that comes to buy them every October. Local people need to benefit from living with predators - and not from killing them and selling their parts - a sustainable future includes people living with wildlife - and an intact healthy ecosystem. I learned from a Panthera biologist, Fernando Tortato writing in a new paper he published this year - that in Jaguar territory in the Pantanal of Brazil a cow is worth $2000 in its lifetime - where each jaguar in this area brings in $108,000 A YEAR in ECOTOURISM income!!!! So jaguars are safe within this area. Think of all the family members in an area that work in ecotourism to show tourists the jaguars, birds and other wildlife of the area. They work in the lodges - drive the boats - guide the tourists etc. But in some parts of its range in South America poaching of jaguars is rampant again - like is was back in the 1960’s and 70’s. We need to get the story out in the press and hopefully Governments will be forced by their citizens to act. There is a loophole in the law that if it is a "cattle killing jaguar"- you cannot make a rancher suffer losses and you can kill the cat. But I found in areas with minimal cattle - all the skins I was shown were called "cattle killers". A earlier project in the Pantanal of Brazil by Sandra Cavalcanti showed only 1% of cattle deaths could be attributed to jaguars - so killing them all for their parts is wrong AND illegal. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything under it. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid To see more images of big cats follow me @stevewinterphoto - Thanks! @thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork #reddigitalcinema@africanparksnetwork @sanctuaryasia

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A puma cub walking on the Tiputini trail in Yasuni National Par

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto A puma cub walking on the Tiputini trail in Yasuni National Park in Ecuador. @natgeo @thephotosociety @yasuni

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An African wild dog in Tswalu Kalajari Reserve, South Africa
Wild dogs a

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo An African wild dog in Tswalu Kalajari Reserve, South Africa Wild dogs are one of Africa’s most endangered carnivores. It was classified as endangered by IUCN in 2016. the challenges facing wild dogs in many areas of Africa stem largely from competition and conflict with an expanding human population. Real community conservation that is based on the continued life of the species rather than it’s death can result in greater and more consistent economic rewards for the future of the local people and the species. With poaching still a problem throughout the world - PSA campaigns based on economics like @WildAid - WORK - and the numbers show that they WORK. To learn more about projects that work - check out - @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork and natgeo.com/bigcats

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2 African wild dogs eating in Tswalu Kalajari Reserve, South Africa
Wild

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo 2 African wild dogs eating in Tswalu Kalajari Reserve, South Africa Wild dogs are one of Africa’s most endangered carnivores. It was classified as endangered by IUCN in 2016. the challenges facing wild dogs in many areas of Africa stem largely from competition and conflict with an expanding human population. Real community conservation that is based on the continued life of the species rather than it’s death can result in greater and more consistent economic rewards for the future of the local people and the species. With poaching still a problem throughout the world - PSA campaigns based on economics like @WildAid - WORK - and the numbers show that they WORK. To learn more about projects that work - check out - @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork and natgeo.com/bigcats

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A new born elephant in the Okavango Delta of Botswana

The greatest singl

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto A new born elephant in the Okavango Delta of Botswana The greatest single step taken to ensure the future of elephants in our world was the Ivory Ban enacted by China. Famous individuals in China like former NBA star Yao Ming and Jackie Chan among many others - have trumpeted WildAid’s mantra “When the buying stops the killing can too" The murder of elephants, tigers and rhinos and other species for their parts needs to stop. Real community conservation that is based on the continued life of the species rather than it’s death can result in greater and more consistent economic rewards for the future of the local people and the species. With poaching still a problem throughout the world - PSA campaigns based on economics like @WildAid - WORK - and the numbers show that they WORK. To learn more about projects that work - check out - @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork and natgeo.com/bigcats

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stevewinterphoto's Media: @stevewinterphoto @natgeo
ANIMALS HAVE EMOTIONS TOO!! A group of elephants smelling me - they have

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo ANIMALS HAVE EMOTIONS TOO!! A group of elephants smelling me - they have four times the smelling sensitivity of bloodhounds. The greatest single step taken to ensure the future of elephants in our world was the Ivory Ban enacted by China. Famous individuals in China like former NBS star Yao Ming and Jackie Chan among many others - have trumpeted WildAid’s mantra “When the buying stops the killing can too" The murder of elephants, tigers and rhinos and other species for their parts needs to stop. Real community conservation that is based on the continued life of the species rather than it’s death can result in greater and more consistent economic rewards for the future of the local people and the species. With poaching still a problem throughout the world - PSA campaigns based on economics like @WildAid - WORK - and the numbers show that they WORK. All sacred teachings tied to the earth believe in sacredness of the animal kingdom - many western religions feel we are higher beings - now bent on the destruction of what keeps us alive - Our Natural World -and it forests and oceans - the air we breathe and the water we drink. We need to realize deep in our hearts that animals have emotions too. If we can treat them better - maybe we could find some empathy inside of us to treat each other better also. Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families, they feed themselves and their families in the same way we as humans used to! If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, maybe we can treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems. To learn more about projects that work - check out - @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork and natgeo.com/bigcats

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Elephants drinking at sunset in the Okavango Delta of Botswana

The great

@natgeo @stevewinterphoto Elephants drinking at sunset in the Okavango Delta of Botswana The greatest single step taken to ensure the future of elephants in our world was the Ivory Ban enacted by China. Famous individuals in China like former NBA star Yao Ming and Jackie Chan among many others - have trumpeted WildAid’s mantra “When the buying stops the killing can too" The murder of elephants, tigers and rhinos and other species for their parts needs to stop. Real community conservation that is based on the continued life of the species rather than it’s death can result in greater and more consistent economic rewards for the future of the local people and the species. With poaching still a problem throughout the world - PSA campaigns based on economics like @WildAid - WORK - and the numbers show that they WORK. To learn more about projects that work - check out - @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork and natgeo.com/bigcats @natgeo @WildAid @africanparksnetwork

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stevewinterphoto's Media: @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto - 3 cubs looking at their pride in the distance.
Just 100 years

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto - 3 cubs looking at their pride in the distance. Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too” Poisonings and poaching are the main threats to lions across their East African range. Most lion populations in East, Central and West Africa are declining so the time to act is now. Their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other body parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @AfricanParksNetwork #followme @stevewinterphoto to see more images and Thanks!! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork #lionstrong #livingwithlions@leonardodicapriofdn

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Shot on iPhone
Nomadic herder coming back from spear

@stevewinterphoto @natgeo @africanparksnetwork Shot on iPhone Nomadic herder coming back from spear fishing in the lake. Zakouma National Park in Chad is one of the most remarkable stories about transformation. In 2010, African Parks, on invitation by the Chadian Government, signed a long-term agreement to manage Zakouma and stop the bloodshed. Our first step was to overhaul law enforcement, but it wasn’t for the faint of heart. In 2012, six of our rangers were gunned down execution-style during their morning prayers. But our rangers, with their indomitable spirits, didn’t give up. Because of their efforts and effective community work, only 24 known elephants have been lost to poaching since 2010. Along with providing law enforcement, we built ‘Elephant Schools’ for local communities, providing desks, blackboards and teachers’ salaries, helping more than 1,500 children get an education. We built airstrips, and VHF radios were installed so community members could contact our control room with information about any illegal activity. People were employed to help manage the park, making Zakouma one of the largest employers in the region. With law enforced and security reclaimed, tourists began to visit, delivering needed revenue back to the park and local communities. And then something miraculous happened. Elephants were able to be elephants once again, and for the first time in years, they began to breed and could raise their young. In early 2017, we counted 81 calves under the age of three. In 2011, we counted one. Elephants have now surpassed 527 individuals and are on the rise for the first time in a decade. We’ve come a long way since 2010. The story of Zakouma is of a park rising from the ashes and becoming an unlikely tale of redemption, for people and animals alike. African Park’s work in Zakouma would not be possible without the support of the partners: The Republic of Chad, the EU, Foundation Segré and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to name a few. #africanparks #annualreport#restoration #NaturesReturn #shotoniphone

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stevewinterphoto's Media: @natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto - pride brother and sisters walking down a trail.
Just 100 years

@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto - pride brother and sisters walking down a trail. Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too” Poisonings and poaching are the main threats to lions across their East African range. Most lion populations in East, Central and West Africa are declining so the time to act is now. Their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other body parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @AfricanParksNetwork #follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and Thanks!! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @thephotosociety @africanparksnetwork #lionstrong #livingwithlions @leonardodicapriofdn

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